One piece of feedback we’ve been hearing lately is that people are fond of our “funny one-liner-caption-whatever-they’re-called things.” We’re very happy that people have taken a shine to these “things,” but we’re a little dismayed that nobody knows what to call them. So we’ve decided to change that.
As such, we want to formally introduce to what we here at Digg call our “Kickers.” They’re one of our favorite things about the site. In fact, we love them so much, we have an entire Twitter account dedicated to them. 
So what’s a kicker? It’s something we write to accompany each story on Digg (you’ll see it circled in the above image). Sometimes funny, sometimes descriptive, we use that space mostly for fun. And yes, we know that in traditional journalism the kicker is the last paragraph of a story or the last story in a TV news cast. But thanks to our resident New York Times alum, we’ve made their misnomer our own.  One piece of feedback we’ve been hearing lately is that people are fond of our “funny one-liner-caption-whatever-they’re-called things.” We’re very happy that people have taken a shine to these “things,” but we’re a little dismayed that nobody knows what to call them. So we’ve decided to change that.
As such, we want to formally introduce to what we here at Digg call our “Kickers.” They’re one of our favorite things about the site. In fact, we love them so much, we have an entire Twitter account dedicated to them. 
So what’s a kicker? It’s something we write to accompany each story on Digg (you’ll see it circled in the above image). Sometimes funny, sometimes descriptive, we use that space mostly for fun. And yes, we know that in traditional journalism the kicker is the last paragraph of a story or the last story in a TV news cast. But thanks to our resident New York Times alum, we’ve made their misnomer our own. 

One piece of feedback we’ve been hearing lately is that people are fond of our “funny one-liner-caption-whatever-they’re-called things.” We’re very happy that people have taken a shine to these “things,” but we’re a little dismayed that nobody knows what to call them. So we’ve decided to change that.

As such, we want to formally introduce to what we here at Digg call our “Kickers.” They’re one of our favorite things about the site. In fact, we love them so much, we have an entire Twitter account dedicated to them. 

So what’s a kicker? It’s something we write to accompany each story on Digg (you’ll see it circled in the above image). Sometimes funny, sometimes descriptive, we use that space mostly for fun. And yes, we know that in traditional journalism the kicker is the last paragraph of a story or the last story in a TV news cast. But thanks to our resident New York Times alum, we’ve made their misnomer our own. 

Notes

  1. talldecafcappuccino reblogged this from bookoisseur and added:
    Huh. I’ve only ever been asked to write the pseudo-headline, one-liner types of kickers. Interesting…learned something...
  2. strass reblogged this from bookoisseur
  3. laughterkey said: Fun story:The other day my friend asked me what I meant when I said I buried the lede. She has a graduate degree in journalism. #how
  4. hammers--and--strings reblogged this from bookoisseur
  5. bookoisseur reblogged this from digg
  6. digg posted this